Islamophobia Research Paper + Annotated Bibliography

everything is in the attachments

Topic Identification 1

Islamophobia: Topic Identification Worksheet

Type your answers below:

1. What topic are you selecting? Why are you choosing this topic?

-The topic I am selecting is Islamophobia and racism. I am choosing this topic because I truly believe the root cause of Islamophobia is indeed racism.

2. Do some basic library research on this topic. Check out anthrosource! Do a search in the Mardigian library’s offerings. Write down three of the article titles that seem relevant and download them articles to your computer. Note these articles may be in the fields of history, anthropology, or sociology, but try to at least find one article that is squarely in an anthropology journal.

a. Making Anthropology Matter in the Heyday of Islamophobia and the ‘Refugee Crisis’: The Case of Poland-Michał Buchowski

b. Islamophobia- Miriam F. Elman

c. Online Islamophobia and the politics of fear: manufacturing the green scare

Mattias Ekman

4. Given what you know about your topic, thus far, why is it important or significant? Why should we care about it?

– I believe it is important because in order to understand how to help “cure” Islamophobia we must really understand what it is and how to cure it.

5. Go ahead, be daring: brainstorm 2 or 3 possible thesis statements. (Hypotheses about your topic in argument form). This is not set in stone. Rather it is a chance to hazard a guess. Remember, your thesis statement should be in the form of an argument and should be refutable.

· Islamophobia, is it really a phobia? Islamophobia is the purest form of racism. Although Islamophobia means “fear” of Islam, it is truly associated with hate, or racism.

· Islamophobia has always been known to be the fear of Islam, but is it really that, or is it just another form of racism, hidden behind a word. I believe it is just plain old racism.

Annotated Bibliography 1

Islamophobia: Thesis Statement and Annotated Bibliography

For this research paper, you are required to find at least 3 peer-reviewed journal articles and then evaluate and annotate those articles in order to build your arguments for your research paper. At the end of this assignment form, you will create an Annotated Bibliography of the sources which you found, formatted in AAA style, which follows the Chicago Manual of Style , 16th edition (Author-date).

Note: You do not need to use the same sources you found in your topic identification worksheet.

Fill in the following form:

1. Your Full Name:

2. Which topic have you chosen for your research paper?

3. Use the following links to find journal articles. The first will help you start finding sources. The second will help you search databases and the third will help you analyze, select, and use the articles you find. Make sure you select articles that seem interesting to you and directly applicable to your topic!

Find & Select Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles for your Research

1st Journal Article Selection and Citation

1. Find the following information about your peer-reviewed article:

a) Article title: What is the title and subtitle of your journal article?

b) Author(s): What are the full names of the article’s authors? Include author affiliations and credentials.

c) Journal Name: What is the name of the journal in which the source was published?

2. Create an In-text citation and a References list citation for your scientific source in AAA style.

a) In-Text Citation: Write an in-text citation in Chicago Author-Date style for your journal article. Use the in-text citation template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

b) AAA References List Citation: Write an AAA References list citation for your journal article. Use the journal article template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

3. Use the “Are Your Sources CRAAP?” criteria to indicate why you selected this article and why you think it is appropriate for university-level research. Use bullet points for each criteria, not paragraphs. Do NOT copy and paste this into your annotation for this article.

3. Create your annotation. In an annotated bibliography, every reference entry is followed by a brief (4-5 sentence) description of the work and its relationship to your research topic. This is for your benefit. What quotes from this work will you be using in your paper? What arguments are relevant? How does this article relate to other articles and theoretical ideas we have discussed in class?At the minimum, you should include a summary, a critique and a reflection on how this source will be used and what it contributes to your arguments.

Your annotation # 1

2nd Journal Article Selection and Citation

1. Find the following information about your peer-reviewed article:

a) Article title: What is the title and subtitle of your journal article?

b) Author(s): What are the full names of the article’s authors? Include author affiliations and credentials.

c) Journal Name: What is the name of the journal in which the source was published?

2. Create an In-text citation and a References list citation for your scientific source in AAA style.

a) In-Text Citation: Write an in-text citation in APA or ASA style for your journal article. Use the in-text citation template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

b) AAA References List Citation: Write an AAA References list citation for your journal article. Use the journal article template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

3. Use the “Are Your Sources CRAAP?” criteria to indicate why you selected this article and why you think it is appropriate for university-level research. Use bullet points for each criteria, not paragraphs. Do NOT copy and paste this into your annotation for this article.

3. Create your annotation. In an annotated bibliography, every reference entry is followed by a brief (4-5 sentence) description of the work and its relationship to your research topic. This is for your benefit. What quotes from this work will you be using in your paper? What arguments are relevant? How does this article relate to other articles and theoretical ideas we have discussed in class? At the minimum, you should include a summary, a critique and a reflection on how this source will be used and what it contributes to your arguments.

Your annotation #2

3rd Journal Article Selection and Citation

1. Find the following information about your peer-reviewed article:

a) Article title: What is the title and subtitle of your journal article?

b) Author(s): What are the full names of the article’s authors? Include author affiliations and credentials.

c) Journal Name: What is the name of the journal in which the source was published?

2. Create an In-text citation and a References list citation for your scientific source in AAA style.

a) In-Text Citation: Write an in-text citation in APA or ASA style for your journal article. Use the in-text citation template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

b) AAA References List Citation: Write an AAA References list citation for your journal article. Use the journal article template on the Cite Your Sources to put together your citation.

3. Use the “Are Your Sources CRAAP?” criteria to indicate why you selected this article and why you think it is appropriate for university-level research. Use bullet points for each criteria, not paragraphs. Do NOT copy and paste this into your annotation for this article.

3. Create your annotation. In an annotated bibliography, every reference entry is followed by a brief (4-5 sentence) description of the work and its relationship to your research topic. This is for your benefit. What quotes from this work will you be using in your paper? What arguments are relevant? How does this article relate to other articles and theoretical ideas we have discussed in class? At the minimum, you should include a summary, a critique and a reflection on how this source will be used and what it contributes to your arguments.

Your annotation #3

How Are Your Articles Related?

What relationships do you see between your journal articles? Include in your answer whether their theoretical positions, issues discussed, arguments, and claims support or refute each other and how you plan to integrate their arguments and evidence together.

Your Thesis Statement and Outline

Use this space to make a first attempt at writing your thesis statement and outlining your paper. Remember a good thesis statement is refutable and specific. It makes a new point about theory or examines how two ideas relate in a new way. It adapts or critiques someone elses argument. Above all, your thesis should be stunning!

Put your thesis statement and outline here:

THESIS STATEMENTS SHOULD BE

Specific

Talk about a specific idea rather than a broad theme. The more concrete the better. You don’t have to come up with a grand theory that explains the universe (even if you could).

Text-based

Your argument should arise from the text, your interview, or ethnographic research; it should not be an imposition of your own personal moral or ethical views. Don’t cast judgment on the social actors.

Unified

Be sure that you’re arguing one thing. Avoid bifurcated thesis statements.

Not too obvious

Your essay should point out something that isn’t immediately obvious to someone without a close examination of the texts or ethnographic data. Make sure that what you’re writing about demands that an essay be written about it.

Refutable

It should be possible to come up with a reasonable and valid counterargument to your thesis.

“You don’t write because you [have] to say something; you write because you have something to say.” (adapted fromF. Scott Fitzgerald)

 
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