Sexual Prevention

i need assistance on homework thats due tomorrow. 12/8/19

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Table 1: Rape Prevention and Education (RPE) Efforts on College Campuses

RPE State

Colleges/Universities Approach/Strategy Curricula/Products

AK University of AK- Anchorage Justice Center

-Faculty and Health Department collaborate on state SV prevention plan.

-Faculty developed statewide Random Digit Dial phone survey modeled after National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS).

AR University of AR-Fayetteville -Social Norms Campaigns -Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) -Certified Peer Education through Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Concerning the Health of University Students (BACCHUS)

AZ Arizona State University -Social Norms Campaigns

University of AZ- College of Public Health

-Policy Efforts on SV prevention -Faculty and health department collaborate to develop materials, stats summaries, for HD website

CA Allan Hancock College Cabrillo College California Institute of Technology California State University, Humboldt California State University, Monterey Bay California State University, San Diego California State University, San Jose California State University, Sonoma Chapman University College of Marin College of the Redwoods Contra Costa College De Anza College

-Working with school administrators to strengthen school policies and procedures -Training college students as mentors/educators for high school students -Training college students as leaders for prevention programs and campaigns on campus -Working with fraternities to engage men as leaders in prevention -Conducting campus workshops on how to be an active bystander to prevent sexual violence

-Professional Education for Campus Personnel -Engaging Men and Boys -Bystander Empowerment

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Diablo Valley College Dominican University El Camino Community College Imperial Valley College Los Medanos College Loyola Marymount University Merced Community College Mills College Mira Costa College Mount Saint Mary’s University Occidental College Pepperdine University Saint Mary’s College of California Santa Clara University Santa Rosa Junior College Stanford University University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Merced University of Phoenix University of Southern California West Valley College UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica

-Social Media Campaign -Published a book, “Sexual Assault on Campus: What Colleges Can Do.” Sent to all U.S. College Presidents

FL Florida State University -SV prevention social norms campaigns

University of Central Florida -Developed online education module for incoming Freshman and other new students

University of South Florida -Bar Bystander Project -BarTab project Florida A&M (HBCU) -Male student engagement

through MOST Club (Men of Strength)

-MOST program

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

IL Eastern IL University Charleston University of IL, Champaign University of IL, Springfield Southern IL University, Carbondale IL College, Jacksonville

-Campuses partner with local rape crisis centers to provide campus-based victim services

IN Oakland City University Ball State University Purdue: North Central, Calumet, West Lafayette Indiana University -Purdue University: Indianapolis, Fort Wayne St. Joseph’s College Indiana State

-Social Marketing Campaigns -Coalition-building -Policy analysis and development -Bystander intervention -Male engagement -Some focus on athletes, fraternities, ROTC, and male students

-Step Up! Bystander Intervention -Media literacy education based on the Bro Code

LA Louisiana State University -Bystander engagement -No Zebras MD Towson University -Bystander engagement of

male students -Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) Program

Morgan State University (HBCU)

-Bystander engagement of male students

-Green Dot

MI MI Tech, Houghton Lake Superior State Alma College Central MI University Olivet College Saginaw Valley State University Delta College Oakland University North Central MI College

-Bystander programs -Social Norms campaigns -Addressing organizational practices and providing policy guidance -Targets groups, incl. fraternities/sororities, student housing, faculty/staff in schools of social work, education, and public health, and campus health services

-Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP)

MS Statewide college and university campuses

-Bystander engagement of male students -social norms campaigns

MT University of Montana -Development of Screening Tools: Used for victims and perpetrators (self-identify)

-Screening Tool Catalogue of Evidence Based Practices for Colleges & Universities

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

NJ Rutgers University University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey

-Policy and Social Norms Change -Bystander Approaches -Media Literacy -Social Norms Change

-NJ Gender Norms Survey -Prevention Strategy Toolbox

NV University of NV, Reno Campus

-Bystander intervention -Green Dot

NY See Table 3 — RPE-funded efforts with 20+ colleges/universities. PA Gettysburg College

Robert Morris University Clarion University Dickinson College Mercyhurst University Edinboro University Penn State, Fayette Lebanon Valley College Lehigh University Kings College Wilkes University PA College of Technology Seton Hill University

-Campus readiness assessments -Social norms campaigns -Peer-based outreach and prevention education -Bystander intervention

-Bringing in the Bystander -Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP)

OK Northeastern State University University of OK OK State University. Rose State College

-Educational Sessions during Freshman Orientation -Bystander interventions

-SafeDates -Ending Violence curriculum -Expect Respect

Puerto Rico

Sacred Heart University University of PR

-Awareness Campaigns

SD Northern State University -Bystander engagement of male students -Awareness Campaigns

TX San Angelo State -Bystander program -Men Can Stop Rape Baylor University, Waco Rice University, Houston

-Bystander programs

VA VA Commonwealth -Red Flag and White Ribbon Campaigns

-SafeDates

WI University of WI state system -Educational Sessions -SafeDates WV David & Elkins College

Shepherd University WV State University

-Bystander training to Resident Assistants

Marshall University WV Sch of Osteopathic Med

-Prevention presentation to incoming students

Concord University -SART training to on-campus team

Fairmont State University -Candlelight vigil WY University of WY -Training provided to

university’s STOP Violence program

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Table 2: CDC-funded Rape Prevention and Education (RPE) in New York State Department of Health

Agency Name

County

College Name

Description

Safe Harbors of the Finger Lakes

Ontario Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Conduct the Bringing In The Bystander curriculum with students.

Safe Harbors of the Finger Lakes

Yates Keuka College Conduct the Bringing In The Bystander curriculum with students.

Safe Harbors of the Finger Lakes

Seneca New York Chiropractic College

Conduct the Bringing In The Bystander curriculum with students, staff and faculty.

Cattaraugus County Community Action, Inc.

Allegany Houghton University

Provide training to students related to healthy relationships, sexual assault awareness and safety planning.

Cattaraugus County Community Action, Inc.

Cattaraugus St. Bonaventure University

Train Resident Assistant (RA) staff on sexual assault prevention and bystander intervention.

Cattaraugus County Community Action, Inc.

Cattaraugus Junior College of Cattaraugus County

Provide training to students on bystander intervention, gender stereotypes and date/acquaintance rape.

Oswego County Opportunities, Inc.

Oswego State University of New York (SUNY) Oswego

Collaborate with current partners at the college to identify outreach events and activities to participate in that focus on primary prevention of sexual violence.

Mental Health Association of Columbia Greene Counties

Columbia and Greene

Columbia Greene Community College

Engage men on campus to promote and model healthy non-violent masculinity and to organize and promote events to raise awareness about sexual violence prevention.

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester Syracuse Region

Livingston SUNY Geneseo Provide training to students on sexual violence prevention and provide outreach events on campus.

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester Syracuse Region

Orleans SUNY Brockport Provide sexual violence prevention training to Resident Assistants and provide outreach events on campus.

Planned Parenthood of the Rochester Syracuse Region

Genesee Genesee Community College

Provide Bringing In The Bystander curriculum training to Resident Assistants. Provide sexual violence prevention education to the Athletic Department.

Suicide Erie University of Collaborate with the colleges on various

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Prevention and Crisis Services

Buffalo, Buffalo State College, Medaille College

campus activities focused on primary prevention of sexual violence.

Safe Horizon Richmond College of Staten Island

Implement the Bringing In the Bystander curriculum and train peer educators to provide the curriculum.

Safe Horizon Queens Plaza College Implement the Bringing In the Bystander curriculum and train peer educators to provide the curriculum.

Albany County Crime Victim and Sexual Violence Center

Albany SUNY Albany, College of St. Rose, Russell Sage College

A men’s group at SUNY Albany has created five public service announcements (PSAs). Students will design posters from the PSA’s. The Albany County District Attorney’s Office will partner with SUNY Albany on the release and promotion of the PSAs and posters. The contractor will also conduct a White Ribbon Campaign event at a Siena College vs. SUNY Albany basketball game. The contractor provides a student orientation at the College of St. Rose to educate new students about intimate partner violence, drug-facilitated rape and healthy relationships. The contractor also provides sexual violence prevention education in a College of St. Rose’s Family Violence class and in Siena College’s Sexual Assault, Dating Violence and Healthy Relationships: Peer Advocacy class, spending six days at the college in September 2013.

Crime Victims Assistance Center, Inc.

Broome Broome County Community College

Contractor provides the Green Dot prevention education trainings to students, faculty and staff in order to gain support for a community mobilization project. Trained students will become involved in bystander intervention activities on campus and participate in coalition meetings.

Cayuga Counseling Services

Cayuga Cayuga Community College, Wells College

Contractor provides the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) curriculum to students, faculty and staff in the Criminal Justice program and encourages them to promote the message of non-violence to the campus community and beyond. College students participate in community events, including Take Back the Night to promote healthy relationships, sexual assault awareness and bystander intervention.

Catholic Charities Chenango Morrisville State Contractor will provide prevention education

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

of Chenango County

College training, materials and local statistics on sexual violence to students.

YWCA of Cortland

Cortland SUNY Cortland Contractor will conduct four events/activities at the college to promote healthy relationships, sexual assault awareness and safe dating practices.

Delaware Opportunities Safe Against Violence

Delaware SUNY Delhi Contractor will schedule four trainings with Resident Directors (RDs) on sexual violence prevention. RDs will conduct activities/events with the student population. A theatre performance addressing dating violence will also be presented at the college. The RDs will develop materials and flyers to promote the events.

Family Services Dutchess Marist College Contractor provides the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) training on campus to the Athletic Department, Counseling Center staff, Student Development staff and Housing staff. They have requested that professors offer extra credit to students participating in the MVP trainings. Each training will be co- facilitated by at least one male and one female facilitator. The contractor will also recruit staff, students and off-campus allies to participate in the college’s Interpersonal Violence Prevention Committee (IVPC). They provide a social networking site (Facebook) to increase interactivity on violence prevention and awareness.

YWCA of the Mohawk Valley

Herkimer Herkimer County Community College

Contractor will recruit a student intern to mentor in the Girls’ Circle prevention education programs in middle schools in Herkimer county.

Liberty Resources Inc.

Madison Colgate University, SUNY Morrisville, Cazenovia College

The contractor will meet with the Resident Assistants, Resident Directors and student groups at the three colleges to increase knowledge about primary prevention of sexual violence on each campus.

Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson Inc.

Schoharie SUNY Cobleskill The contractor will recruit 30 students to participate in the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) curriculum. They will also provide two campus events to promote healthy relationships, sexual assault awareness and bystander intervention.

Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson Inc.

Essex North Country Community College

The contractor will recruit and train students as peer educators and plan activities to promote campus-wide awareness of sexual violence prevention. Extra credit is given to

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

students who participate through the Women’s Services Program, which has been a successful way to recruit in the past.

Planned Parenthood Mohawk Hudson Inc.

Schenectady Union College, Schenectady County Community College

Contractor provides prevention education to students in classes, dorm activities, fraternity and athletic groups to encourage them to join as allies and to form their own campus groups to address sexual violence and promote prevention strategies.

Nassau County Coalition Against Domestic Violence Inc.

Nassau Molloy University, Adelphi University, Hofstra University, Nassau County Community College

Contractor provides trainings to Resident Assistants, Resident Directors, classes and other campus groups on healthy relationships and safety. The contractor will also be conducting a Clothesline Project at Nassau County Community College.

Opportunities for Otsego

Otsego SUNY Oneonta, Hartwick College

The contractor conducts events and activities on campus to promote healthy relationships, sexual assault awareness and safe dating practices. The contractor will conduct a Clothesline Project with both colleges. The contractor will utilize the A Call To Men program to re-educate males to challenge sexism.

Samaritan Hospital

Rensselaer Russell Sage College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

The contractor will offer Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) training to student leaders and faculty at the two colleges. The contractor will promote coalition participation among the college staff with county stakeholders and other organizations that will develop a media guide on primary prevention. The guide will target male bystanders, promote male accountability and encourage males to challenge beliefs and attitudes they witness which promote sexual violence and intimate partner violence.

VIBs Family Violence and Rape Crisis Center

Suffolk Suffolk County Community College, St. Joseph’s College, SUNY Old Westbury

Contractor will provide presentations to college students on domestic and sexual violence. Topics will include types of abuse, the cycle of violence, consent, and what to do if sexually assaulted. In order to overcome the barrier of limited allowed classroom time, professors have pledged to continue discussing these issues throughout the semester.

Catskill Regional Medical Center

Sullivan Sullivan County Community College

The contractor collaborates with a women’s group on campus that provides training on healthy relationships and safety planning.

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Students assist to identify steps to heighten awareness and increase safety on campus, which will be shared with the college administration. A “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event is also planned on campus.

Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Services of Saratoga County

Saratoga Skidmore College The contractor met with peer mentors to discuss dating violence and sexual assault and how they can help students experiencing sexual violence.

Advocacy Center of Tompkins County

Tompkins Tompkins Cortland Community College

The contractor is implementing the Bringing in the Bystander curriculum with three college groups and will plan outreach events at each college. A coalition comprised of community members and college students will attend meetings to promote community investment in primary prevention of sexual violence.

Victim Resource Center of the Finger Lakes

Wayne Finger Lakes Community College

The contractor provides three 90-minute sessions of the Bringing in the Bystander curriculum to students who will serve as role models for other students during Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Students will plan a sexual violence prevention campaign which will include a workshop, information booth and media coverage. Additional written information will be made available to all students throughout the year. Resources from RAINN will help to plan the campaign.

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Table 3. Prevention Programming Conducted by Currently or Previously OVW-funded Colleges and Universities.

Table 3 lists prevention programming conducted by responding schools, including programming not directly funded by OVW’s Campus Program. Sample school-specific examples are provided, but many more exist. This list includes a range of programs with various levels of evaluation.

Prevention Strategies

Colleges/Universities National Programs and Curricula

Sample School- Customized Programming (Not Inclusive)

Bystander Intervention

A&M University Clark University Gallaudet University Humboldt State University North Central College Northwestern University Ohio University San Diego Southern University St. John’s University University of California, University of Delaware University of Illinois, Chicago University of Mississippi University of New Hampshire University of North Carolina,

Wilmington University of Portland University of Richmond Washington State University,

Pullman Western Oregon University

Green Dot Step UP! Bringing in the Bystander

Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP)

Training programs at freshmen orientation

Training peer- advocates

Check IT (Humboldt University)

Clark Anti-Violence Education (CAVE) Program (Clark University)

My Stand Mentor Program (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)

Bystander Intervention Training (BIT) (University of California, San Diego)

Engaging Men

Angelo State University Cal State Poly at Pomona DePauw University Dickinson College Elizabeth City State University Grand Valley State University Howard University Humboldt State University Loyola University of Chicago Middlebury College Nassau Community College North Carolina Central University North Carolina State University

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes

Coaching Boys into Men

Beyond Tough Guise White Ribbon Campaign

School chapters of Men Against Rape

V-Men Men of Strength (MOST)

Healthy masculinity

Men Creating Change (North Carolina Central University)

Northwestern University’s Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault (MARS) (Northwestern University)

Oxy Men Against Rape (OMAR)

(Occidental College)

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Engaging Men, Cont.

North Central College Northwestern University Occidental College Ohio University Old Dominion University Pacific Lutheran University Samford University University of Colorado, Colorado

Springs University of Delaware University of Houston University of Massachusetts,

Dartmouth University of Mississippi University of Missouri Kansas

City University of Montana University of North Carolina,

Wilmington University of Vermont and State

Agricultural College Western Illinois University William Paterson University Winona State University

presentations “Bro Code” workshops A Call to Men presentations

Academic courses on men and masculinity

Presentations at freshman orientation

Voices of Men (University of Colorado, Colorado Springs)

Men Advocating Nonviolence (MAN) (Western Illinois University)

Men’s Project (Loyola University Chicago)

Healthy Sexuality Education

Alabama State University Clark University North Central College Ohio University Old Dominion University St. John’s University University of California, San

Diego University of Delaware University of New Hampshire University of Southern Maine Western Illinois University Western Oregon University Winthrop University

Vagina Monologues Healthy gender identity workshops

Healthy relationships workshops

Presentations at incoming student orientation

Prevention Innovations (University of New Hampshire)

Peer Health Educators (North Central College)

Public Awareness

Alabama State University Bucknell University Cal State Poly at Pomona Clark University Connecticut College DePauw University East Central University East Stroudsburg University Elizabeth City State University Fairmont State University

Take Back the Night “These Hands Don’t Hurt” Campaign

V-Day Greeks Against Sexual Assault

Silent Witness Project The Clothesline Project

The Red Flag

Sexual Assault Prevention and Education (SAPE) (University of Delaware)

Oxy Sexual Assault Coalition (Occidental College)

Project SAFE (Occidental College)

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Public Awareness, Cont.

Fitchburg State University Gallaudet University Gannon University Gateway Community and Technical College

Georgia College and State University

Grand Valley State University Howard University Humboldt State University Jefferson College of Health Sciences

Lone Star College System Loyola University of Chicago Minot State University Mississippi State University Nassau Community College Norfolk State University North Carolina Central University North Carolina State University North Central College North Central Texas College Northwestern University Occidental College Ohio University Old Dominion University Pacific Lutheran University Prairie View A&M University Saint Mary’s College Samford University Shaw University Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

Southeast Missouri State University

St. John’s University University of California, San Diego

University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

University of Delaware University of Louisiana Monroe University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

University of Mississippi University of Missouri Kansas City University of Montana University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Campaign Sexual Assault Awareness Month programming

Turn Off the Violence Week

Students Against Violence Everywhere

Educational video screenings

Pamphlet distribution Mandatory online tutorials such as Haven

Posting informative posters around campus

Incoming student orientation sessions

The Consent Project (Humboldt University)

Fitchburg Anti- Violence Education (FAVE) (Fitchburg State University)

Belles Against Violence (St. Mary’s College)

Eyes Wide Open (Grand Valley State University)

Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention Program (SHARPP) (University of New Hampshire)

Relationship & Sexual Violence Prevention (RSVP) Program (Prairie View A&M)

It Ends Now (University of Richmond)

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

University of New Hampshire University of North Carolina, Wilmington

University of Puerto Rico Carolina University of Richmond University of Texas Pan American University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

Utah State University Virginia State University Voorhees College West Virginia State University Western Illinois University William Paterson University Winona State University Winthrop University

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Table 4. Prevention Programs Suggested as Promising by Public Commenters to the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault

Table 4 lists prevention programs suggested by public commenters in chat sessions or written comments. OVW has not reviewed these programs.

Prevention Strategies

Colleges/Universities Programs – National or School- Specific/Customized

Bystander Intervention

Binghamton University Interpersonal Violence Prevention Team Keene State College Mentors in Violence Prevention The College of St. Scholastica BEST Party Model Arizona (statewide) The Arizona Safer Bars Alliance Indiana University ABCD Model University of Kentucky (and national)

Green Dot

University of Arizona Step Up! National social marketing campaign

Know Your Power

National Marie Testa’s parent-student model

Engaging Men Williams College Men for Consent Duke University XY Campaign;

Duke’s Men Acting for Change Tulane University Tulane Men Against Violence

Harvard University Harvard Men Against Rape

Tufts University Tufts Men Against Violence; In the SACK (Safety, Awareness, Consent, Knowledge)

Northwestern University Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault (MARS)* Pacific Lutheran University “Healthy Masculinity” Loyola University Chicago Men’s Project*

Healthy Sexuality Education

Virginia Commonwealth University

“Can I Wear Your Hat” Video

Yale University Communication and Consent Educators Indiana University RAISE: He Said, She Said Program

Public Awareness

University of North Carolina Helping Advocates for Violence Ending Now (HAVEN); Injury Prevention Research Center’s PREVENT project

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Public Awareness, Cont.

Middlebury College It Happens Here Colby College, Williams College Party With Consent Hamilton College Sexual Assault and Misconduct Information Eastern Oregon University Sex Matters: Sexual Assault Prevention and

Response Program University of Texas at Austin Voices Against Violence Emory University Greeks Against Sexual Assault;

Project Unspoken Dartmouth College Dartmouth Change University of Akron Defined Lines University of Northern Colorado Sexual Assault Free Environment Marshall University The Center for the Prevention of Violence

Against Women Indiana (statewide) Indiana Campus Sexual Assault Prevention

Project Ohio (statewide) The Ohio Board of Regents Office of Campus

Safety and Security University of Montana Personal Empowerment Through Self Awareness

(PETSA) Old Dominion University Sexual Assault Free Environment (SAFE)* Occidental College Project SAFE* Michigan State University Sexual Assault Program Howard University Interpersonal Violence Prevention Program National Sex Signals University of Illinois, Chicago Campus Advocacy Network Cornell University University Counseling and Advising Network

(U-CAN)

* Program is also listed in Table 3.

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Appendix A. Resources on Selected Prevention Programs

Below are resources for locating additional information about the selected evidence-based and promising prevention strategies mentioned in Part One of this report. Provision of this information does not constitute endorsement of these programs by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. Not all programs are publicly available for implementation at no-cost. Some programs are proprietary and may be available only for a fee or directly from the program developer.

Program Resources for more information

Safe Dates http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov/ViewIntervention.aspx?id=141 https://www.hazelden.org/web/go/safedates Foshee, V. A., Linder, G. F., Bauman, K. E., Langwick, S. A., Arriaga, X. B., Heath, J. L., . . . Bangdiwala, S. (1996). The Safe Dates project: Theoretical basis, evaluation design, and selected baseline findings. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 12(5, Suppl), 39-47. Foshee, V. A., Bauman, K. E., Ennett, S. T., Linder, G. F., Benefield, T., & Suchindran, C. (2004). Assessing the long-term effects of the Safe Dates program and a booster in preventing and reducing adolescent dating violence victimization and perpetration. American Journal of Public Health, 94(4), 619-624.

Shifting Boundaries

http://www.crimesolutions.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?ID=226 http://www.preventconnect.org/2013/05/shifting_boundaries/ Taylor, B., Stein, N., Woods, D., & Mumford, E. (2011). Shifting Boundaries: Final report on an experimental evaluation of a youth dating violence prevention program in New York city middle schools. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice.

Coaching Boys into

Men

http://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/section/our_work/men_and_boys/_coaching_leadership/ http://www.preventconnect.org/2012/03/web-conference-coaching-boys-into-men/ Miller, E., Tancredi, D. J., McCauley, H. L., Decker, M. R., Virata, M. C. D., Anderson, H. A., . . . Silverman, J. G. (2013). One-year follow-up of a coach-delivered dating violence prevention program: A cluster randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45(1), 108-112

Bringing in the

Bystander

http://cola.unh.edu/prevention-innovations/bystander https://www.crimesolutions.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?ID=159 Banyard, V. L., Moynihan, M. M., & Plante, E. G. (2007). Sexual violence prevention through bystander education: An experimental evaluation. Journal of Community Psychology, 35(4), 463- 481.

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Appendix B. Best Practices for Sexual Violence Prevention: A Summary Guide for Colleges and Universities

This brief summary of best practices can help colleges and universities select or develop sexual violence prevention programs and comprehensive campus-wide strategies for implementation on campus. Programs and strategies that align with the principles for effective prevention (Nation et al., 2003) and are consistent with the best available evidence (DeGue et al., 2014) have a better chance of succeeding. This guide serves as a resource to prevention planners on campus to help identify key factors to consider when developing or selecting a strategy to implement.

When selecting a prevention strategy, also consider the strengths and needs of the college and its students. Climate surveys or focus groups/listening sessions with students and staff can inform prevention efforts. For example, a college or university may experience specific challenges related to sexual harassment on campus, excessive alcohol use, or rape-supportive attitudes on certain athletic teams. A comprehensive strategy should incorporate components to address each of these issues based on the best available evidence and principles of effective prevention.

Prioritize the Best Available Research Evidence

Implement prevention strategies with the best available research evidence whenever possible. When assessing the strength of the available research, consider:

Research design: Look for outcome evaluations that utilize an experimental design. Experimental designs that utilize random assignment and control groups typically provide the strongest evidence of effectiveness. Other well-conducted research designs, such as quasi-experimental and pre-post studies, can provide preliminary evidence showing promise but do not rule out other potential explanations for change. Strong research designs include longer-term measurement of outcomes (e.g., greater than 6 months); immediate post-test measures often produce unreliable results.

Outcome measures: Studies that measure sexual violence behavior as an outcome, including self-reported victimization or perpetration, are best. Measurement of risk factors and related behaviors (e.g., attitudes, bystanding behavior) is useful for understanding immediate effects, but it is not sufficient for determining overall effectiveness for preventing sexual violence.

Study population: Select interventions that have been developed for or tested with college populations similar to your campus, when available. Because few programs with strong or promising evidence of effectiveness for college students currently exist, consider adapting evidence-based strategies from other populations (e.g., high-school).

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

Alternatively, choose an existing, non-evidence-based strategy developed for college populations that reflects the principles of effective prevention.

Consider the Principles of Effective Prevention

Implementing strategies consistent with the principles of effective prevention may boost the likelihood of preventing sexual violence. This may be especially true when rigorous evidence of effectiveness is unavailable to guide decision-making3. Research suggests that prevention strategies are more likely to affect behavior when they are/have:

Comprehensive: Comprehensive prevention plans should include components that address risk and protective factors at multiple levels—including the behavior and risk characteristics of individuals, peer and partner relationships, social norms and campus climate, and structural and institutional factors and policies that contribute to risk for, or help prevent, sexual violence. See Part One of this report (Figure 1) for an example of comprehensive campus prevention strategy.

Appropriately timed in development: College prevention efforts should focus on risk and protective factors that are most relevant in young adulthood and in the college environment, such as social norms about sex and gender, alcohol use, changing peer and partner relationships, housing (e.g., fraternities, dorms, apartments), on- and off-campus social activities (e.g., parties, sporting events), and campus climate and safety.

Sufficient “dosage”: Longer, multi-session programs tend to be more effective than brief, single-session interventions. However, the specific length of exposure (e.g., contact hours) needed to change behavior depends on the nature and goals of the specific intervention.

Well-trained implementers: Implementers should be stable, committed, competent, and able to connect effectively with students. “Buy-in” to the program model helps staff deliver and reinforce program messages with greater credibility.

Socio-culturally relevant: Prevention programs and strategies should be culturally relevant and appropriate, in both content and approach, to the individuals and/or groups served. Climate surveys and focus groups with students can help college prevention

3 Additional practical guidance regarding application of the Principles of Prevention is available here: Applying the Principles of Prevention: What Do Prevention Practitioners Need to Know About What Works (2003). Nation, M., Crusto, C., Wandersman, A., Kumpfer, K. L., Seybolt, D., Morrissey-Kane, E., & Davino, K. American Psychologist, 58, 449-456. Prepared for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Violence Prevention.

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

coordinators and administrators select or adapt strategies that will meet the needs of their student body.

Sound theory of change: Prevention strategies should be supported by a logical theory of change. It is important to understand how the intervention components or content are expected to impact evidence-based risk and protective factors and, ultimately, sexual violence. See Tharp et al. (2013) for a systematic review of risk and protective factors for sexual violence perpetration.

Build on or support positive relationships: Prevention approaches that build on or foster positive relationships between students and their peers, families or communities may have better outcomes. For example, programs may use trusted mentors, teachers, or coaches to deliver the intervention content or they could engage students in peer- facilitated activities or support groups designed to encourage and support positive behavior.

Varied teaching methods: Interactive instruction and opportunities for active, skills- based learning help to engage participants in multiple ways (e.g., writing exercises, role plays) and may be associated with more positive outcomes than interventions which involve only passive audiences (e.g., lecture, films). Multiple interventions that reinforce the same messages or skills in different contexts and using different teaching methods may also improve outcomes.

Outcome evaluation: Strategies that have been rigorously evaluated and shown to have effects on sexual violence or related outcomes are best bets when selecting a prevention approach to implement. Continuous monitoring and evaluation of implementation quality and key outcomes during program implementation can also provide important ongoing feedback and may improve outcomes. The Getting to Outcomes® Toolkit can help campuses plan, implement, and evaluate the impact of their comprehensive strategy (See http://www.rand.org/health/projects/getting-to-outcomes.html).

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

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of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

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This report was prepared for the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault (April 2014). The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position

of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated: 6/18/2014

 
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