Week 9: Reflection & Summary

Read the article at the following link from Counseling Today.

http://ct.counseling.org/2009/05/from-burning-bright-to-simply-burned-out/ (Links to an external site.)

Write a one page summary of the chapter for this week as well as the article in the link above.

Write a 2 page summary and reflection of your readings.

What stood out to you?

How do your readings relate to the self-care plan you proposed in your discussion this week.    At the end of the term, WEEK 9, you will evaluate your commitment, growth, and follow-through based on the plan you had created for yourself on week 2.

 

Additional Resources

  • Compassion Satisfaction and Fatigue
    Wonder if you have Compassion Fatigue, Vicarious Trauma, are burned out, or in fact have Compassion Satisfaction? This is a highly reliable test and is used a great deal in research on the subject.

  • Psychology Today, Burnout (Links to an external site.)
    There are four neat articles from Psychology Today that are relevant to us all: “Why Am I so Burned Out?” “You Brain Needs a Break,” “The Fast Track to Burnout,” and “Take This Job and Love It” are all good articles on the basics of burnout and what to do about it.
  • Headington Institute’s Web Page for Caregivers (Links to an external site.)
    This page has a brief synopsis of signs and symptoms in relation to understanding and addressing vicarious trauma.

    CHAPTER SIXTEEN: HUMAN SERVICES WORKERS IN CRISIS: BURNOUT, VICARIOUS TRAUMATIZATION, AND COMPASSION FATIGUE

    HELPING PROFESSIONALS: PRIME CANDIDATES

     Nature of the job is to be intensely involved with people who are in need of assistance.

     Recipe for burnout: High levels of motivation  Idealistic Expectation that their work will give their life a sense

    of meaning

     Many helping professions have historically low success rates.

     Human service field is becoming more difficult .

    DEFINING BURNOUT  Historical roots from the 1970s

     “Burned out” physically, emotionally, spiritually, interpersonally, and behaviorally to the point of exhaustion.

     Herbert Freudenberger (1974, 1975)  Described young, idealistic volunteers working in

    alternative health-care settings who started to look and act worse than many of their clients.

     Burnout consists of the following:  Lost energy to the point of exhaustion  Lost enthusiasm to the point of absolute indifference  Passion is replaced by cynicism  Complete lack of confidence that your work is having

    any positive impact

    DYNAMICS OF BURNOUT  Foundation Blocks of Burnout

     Role ambiguity  Role conflict  Role overload  Inconsequentiality  Isolation  Autonomy

     Research on Burnout Dynamics

     Myths That Engender Burnout

     Symptoms of Burnout  Behavioral  Physical  Interpersonal  Attitudinal

    DYNAMICS OF BURNOUT CONT.

     Levels of Burnout Trait State Activity

     Stages of Burnout Enthusiasm Stagnation Frustration Apathy

    WORKER–CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS

    Countertransference

    Secondary Traumatic Stress Vicarious Traumatization Compassion Fatigue

    Compassion Satisfaction

    THE CULPABILITY OF ORGANIZATIONS

     Much of the responsibility lies with the employer. Employee’s influence on policy and procedures Employee’s level of autonomy Employee’s feeling of appreciation

     Employers should provide consultation and supervision.

     Employers should offer support, social connection, and self-care opportunities.

    SELF-RECOGNITION OF BURNOUT

    NO ONE IS IMMUNE!

    Everyone has a blind spot.

     Typical MO is to increase effort (actually increases the problem) rather than attempting to change the situation.

    INTERVENTION STRATEGIES  Assessment

    Burnout Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction Work Environment

     Intervention Through Training

     Intervention With the Organization Burnout-Proofing an Agency Social Support Systems Support Groups The Individual and the Organization

     Self-Care

    PRIVATE PRACTITIONERS AND BURNOUT

     Isolation

     Business Concerns  Financial  Client base  Marketing services

     Maintaining a Public Presence

     Difficult Work Schedule  Evenings  Weekends  Few vacations

    INTERVENTION WITH THE INDIVIDUAL

     Direct Action  Palliative Action  BASIC IDS

    Behavior Affect Sensation  Imagery Cognition  Interpersonal relationships Drugs/biology Setting

    EPILOGUE: CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISONS

    Victor Savicki (2002) landmark study using the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales

    General environmental work measures

     Individual conformity measures

    • Chapter Sixteen: Human Services Workers in Crisis: Burnout, Vicarious Traumatization, and Compassion Fatigue
    • Helping Professionals: Prime Candidates
    • Defining Burnout
    • Dynamics of Burnout
    • Dynamics of Burnout Cont.
    • Worker–Client Relationships
    • The Culpability of Organizations
    • Self-Recognition of Burnout
    • Intervention Strategies
    • Private Practitioners and Burnout
    • INTERVENTION WITH THE INDIVIDUAL
    • Epilogue: Cross-Cultural Comparisons
 
Do you need a similar assignment done for you from scratch? We have qualified writers to help you. We assure you an A+ quality paper that is free from plagiarism. Order now for an Amazing Discount!
Use Discount Code "Newclient" for a 15% Discount!

NB: We do not resell papers. Upon ordering, we do an original paper exclusively for you.